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We are the Theory group of LPS!

If you are interested in doing an internship with us, or want to visit and discuss, please contact any of our members.

We are a very collaborative group which covers a wide range of topics from material sciences (functional materials, topological and relativistic matter, magnetism and superconductivity...) and quantum systems (in low dimensions, under magnetic fields, in and out-of equilibrium...) to soft and bio- matter (colloids, liquid crystals...).

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  • Most recent peer-reviewed publications are below.

Recent Publications

A. Jagannathan, Jeena, P., and Tarzia, M., “Nonmonotonic crossover and scaling behavior in a disordered one-dimensional quasicrystal”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 99, p. 054203, 2019.Abstract
We consider a noninteracting disordered 1D quasicrystal in the weak-disorder regime. We show that the critical states of the pure model approach strong localization in strikingly different ways, depending on their renormalization properties. A finite-size scaling analysis of the inverse participation ratios of states (IPR) of the quasicrystal shows that they are described by several kinds of scaling functions. While most states show a progressively increasing IPR as a function of the scaling variable, other states exhibit a nonmonotonic ``reentrant{''} behavior wherein the IPR first decreases, and passes through a minimum, before increasing. This surprising behavior is explained in the framework of perturbation renormalization group treatment, where wave functions can be computed analytically as a function of the hopping amplitude ratio and the disorder, however it is not specific to this model. Our results should help to clarify results of recent studies of localization due to random and quasiperiodic potentials.
N. Manca, et al., “Bimodal Phase Diagram of the Superfluid Density in LaAlO3/SrTiO3 Revealed by an Interfacial Waveguide Resonator”, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, vol. 122, p. 036801, 2019.Abstract
We explore the superconducting phase diagram of the two-dimensional electron system at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface by monitoring the frequencies of the cavity modes of a coplanar waveguide resonator fabricated in the interface itself. We determine the phase diagram of the superconducting transition as a function of the temperature and electrostatic gating, finding that both the superfluid density and the transition temperature follow a dome shape but that the two are not monotonically related. The ground state of this two-dimensional electron system is interpreted as a Josephson junction array, where a transition from long-to short-range order occurs as a function of the electronic doping. The synergy between correlated oxides and superconducting circuits is revealed to be a promising route to investigate these exotic compounds, complementary to standard magnetotransport measurements.
S. Chen, et al., “Competing Fractional Quantum Hall and Electron Solid Phases in Graphene”, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, vol. 122, p. 026802, 2019.Abstract
We report experimental observation of the reentrant integer quantum Hall effect in graphene, appearing in the N = 2 Landau level. Similar to high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures, the effect is due to a competition between incompressible fractional quantum Hall states, and electron solid phases. The tunability of graphene allows us to measure the B-T phase diagram of the electron solid phase. The hierarchy of reentrant states suggests spin and valley degrees of freedom play a role in determining the ground state energy. We find that the melting temperature scales with magnetic field, and construct a phase diagram of the electron liquid-solid transition.
R. Botet and Kuratsuji, H., “The duality between a non-Hermitian two-state quantum system and a massless charged particle”, JOURNAL OF PHYSICS A-MATHEMATICAL AND THEORETICAL, vol. 52, p. 035303, 2019.Abstract
We show that the equations for the dynamics of a non-Hermitian two-state quantum system arc the same as the equations of motion for a massless charged particle in an electromagnetic field. Using simple analytical arguments to prove this unexpected duality between two very different domains in physics, we further exemplify it through a case-study of polarization of light propagating in a dichroic medium with magneto-optic activity.
I. Safi, “Driven quantum circuits and conductors: A unifying perturbative approach”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 99, p. 045101, 2019.Abstract
We develop and exploit an out-of-equilibrium theory, valid in arbitrary dimensions, which does not require initial thermalization. It is perturbative with respect to a weak time-dependent (TD) Hamiltonian term, but is nonperturbative with respect to strong coupling to an electromagnetic environment or to Coulomb or superconducting correlations. We derive unifying relations between the current generated by coherent radiation or statistical mixture of radiations, superimposed on a dc voltage V-dc, and the out-of-equilibrium dc current which encodes the effects of interactions. We extend fully the lateral band-transmission picture, thus quantum superposition, to coherent many-body correlated states. This provides methods for a determination of the carrier's charge q free from unknown parameters through the robustness of the Josephson-like frequency. We have derived similar relations for noise (I. Safi, arXiv:1401.5950) which have been exploited, recently, to determine the fractional charge in the fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) within the Jain series {[}M. Kapfer et al., Science (to be published)]. The present theory allows for breakdown of inversion symmetry and for asymmetric rates for emission and absorption of radiations. This generates rectification exploited here to propose methods to measure the charge q, as well as spectroscopical analysis of the out-of-equilibrium dc current and the third cumulant of non-Gaussian source of noise. We also apply the theory to the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid (TLL), showing a counterintuitive feature: A Lorentzian pulse superimposed on V-dc can reduce the current compared to its dc value, at the same V-dc, questioning the terminology ``photoassisted.{''} Beyond a charge current, the theory applies to operators such as spin current in the spin Hall effect or voltage drop across a phase-slip Josephson junction.
S. Gariglio, Caviglia, A. D., Triscone, J. - M., and Gabay, M., “A spin-orbit playground: surfaces and interfaces of transition metal oxides”, REPORTS ON PROGRESS IN PHYSICS, vol. 82, p. 012501, 2019.Abstract
Within the last twenty years, the status of the spin-orbit interaction has evolved from that of a simple atomic contribution to a key effect that modifies the electronic band structure of materials. It is regarded as one of the basic ingredients for spintronics, locking together charge and spin degrees of freedom and recently it is instrumental in promoting a new class of compounds, the topological insulators. In this review, we present the current status of the research on the spin-orbit coupling in transition metal oxides, discussing the case of two semiconducting compounds, SrTiO3 and KTaO3, and the properties of surface and interfaces based on these. We conclude with the investigation of topological effects predicted to occur in different complex oxides.
H. Braganca, Sakai, S., Aguiar, M. C. O., and Civelli, M., “Correlation-Driven Lifshitz Transition at the Emergence of the Pseudogap Phase in the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model”, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, vol. 120, p. 067002, 2018.Abstract
We study the relationship between the pseudogap and Fermi-surface topology in the two-dimensional Hubbard model by means of the cellular dynamical mean-field theory. We find two possible mean-field metallic solutions on a broad range of interactions, doping, and frustration: a conventional renormalized metal and an unconventional pseudogap metal. At half filling, the conventional metal is more stable and displays an interaction-driven Mott metal-insulator transition. However, for large interactions and small doping, a region that is relevant for cuprates, the pseudogap phase becomes the ground state. By increasing doping, we show that a first-order transition from the pseudogap to the conventional metal is tied to a change of the Fermi surface from hole- to electronlike, unveiling a correlation-driven mechanism for a Lifshitz transition. This explains the puzzling link between the pseudogap phase and Fermi surface topology that has been pointed out in recent experiments.
P. Vodnala, et al., “Hard-sphere-like dynamics in highly concentrated alpha-crystallin suspensions”, PHYSICAL REVIEW E, vol. 97, p. 020601, 2018.Abstract
The dynamics of concentrated suspensions of the eye-lens protein alpha crystallin have been measured using x-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. Measurements were made at wave vectors corresponding to the first peak in the hard-sphere structure factor and volume fractions close to the critical volume fraction for the glass transition. Langevin dynamics simulations were also performed in parallel to the experiments. The intermediate scattering function f (q, tau) could be fit using a stretched exponential decay for both experiments and numerical simulations. The measured relaxation times show good agreement with simulations for polydisperse hard-sphere colloids.
M. Trif, Dmytruk, O., Bouchiat, H., Aguado, R., and Simon, P., “Dynamic current susceptibility as a probe of Majorana bound states in nanowire-based Josephson junctions”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 97, p. 041415, 2018.Abstract
We theoretically study a Josephson junction based on a semiconducting nanowire subject to a time-dependent flux bias. We establish a general density-matrix approach for the dynamical response of the Majorana junction and calculate the resulting flux-dependent susceptibility using both microscopic and effective low-energy descriptions for the nanowire. We find that the diagonal component of the susceptibility, associated with the dynamics of the Majorana state populations, dominates over the standard Kubo contribution for a wide range of experimentally relevant parameters. The diagonal term, explored, in this Rapid Communication, in the context of Majorana physics, allows probing accurately the presence of Majorana bound states in the junction.
M. Thakurathi, Simon, P., Mandal, I., Klinovaja, J., and Loss, D., “Majorana Kramers pairs in Rashba double nanowires with interactions and disorder”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 97, p. 045415, 2018.Abstract
We analyze the effects of electron-electron interactions and disorder on a Rashba double-nanowire setup coupled to an s-wave superconductor, which has been recently proposed as a versatile platform to generate Kramers pairs of Majorana bound states in the absence of magnetic fields. We identify the regime of parameters for which these Kramers pairs are stable against interaction and disorder effects. We use bosonization, perturbative renormalization group, and replica techniques to derive the flow equations for various parameters of the model and evaluate the corresponding phase diagram with topological and disorder-dominated phases. We confirm aforementioned results by considering a more microscopic approach, which starts from the tunneling Hamiltonian between the three-dimensional s-wave superconductor and the nanowires. We find again that the interaction drives the system into the topological phase and, as the strength of the source term coming from the tunneling Hamiltonian increases, strong electron-electron interactions are required to reach the topological phase.
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