Publications

2018
M. Trushin, Goerbig, M. O., and Belzig, W., “Model Prediction of Self-Rotating Excitons in Two-Dimensional Transition-Metal Dichalcogenides”, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, vol. 120, p. 187401, 2018.Abstract
Using the quasiclassical concept of Berry curvature we demonstrate that a Dirac exciton-a pair of Dirac quasiparticles bound by Coulomb interactions-inevitably possesses an intrinsic angular momentum making the exciton effectively self-rotating. The model is applied to excitons in two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides, in which the charge carriers are known to be described by a Dirac-like Hamiltonian. We show that the topological self-rotation strongly modifies the exciton spectrum and, as a consequence, resolves the puzzle of the overestimated two-dimensional polarizability employed to fit earlier spectroscopic measurements.
O. Najera, Civelli, M., Dobrosavljevic, V., and Rozenberg, M. J., “Multiple crossovers and coherent states in a Mott-Peierls insulator”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 97, p. 045108, 2018.Abstract
We consider the dimer Hubbard model within dynamical mean-field theory to study the interplay and competition between Mott and Peierls physics. We describe the various metal-insulator transition lines of the phase diagram and the breakdown of the different solutions that occur along them. We focus on the specific issue of the debated Mott-Peierls insulator crossover and describe the systematic evolution of the electronic structure across the phase diagram. We found that at low intradimer hopping, the emerging local magnetic moments can unbind above a characteristic singlet temperature T{*}. Upon increasing the interdimer hopping, subtle changes occur in the electronic structure. Notably, we find Hubbard bands of a mix character with coherent and incoherent excitations. We argue that this statemight be relevant formaterials such as VO2 and its signaturesmay be observed in spectroscopic studies, and possibly through pump-probe experiments.
N. Ghenzi, et al., “One-transistor one-resistor (1T1R) cell for large-area electronics”, APPLIED PHYSICS LETTERS, vol. 113, p. 072108, 2018.Abstract
We developed a one-transistor one-resistor cell composed of one TiO2-based resistive switching (RS) device and one ZnO-based thin-film transistor (TFT). We study the electric characteristics of each component individually, and their interplay when both work together. We explored the direct control of bipolar RS devices, using our TFTs to drive current in both directions. We also report striking power implications when we swap the terminals of the RS device. The target of our work is the introduction of RS devices in large-area electronic (LAE) circuits. In this context, RS devices can be beneficial regarding functionality and energy consumption, when compared to other ways to introduce memory cells in LAE circuits. Published by AIP Publishing.
F. Tesler, et al., “Relaxation of a Spiking Mott Artificial Neuron”, PHYSICAL REVIEW APPLIED, vol. 10, p. 054001, 2018.Abstract
We consider the phenomenon of electric Mott transition (EMT), which is an electrically induced insulator-to-metal transition. Experimentally, it is observed that depending on the magnitude of the electric excitation, the final state may show a short-lived or a long-lived resistance change. We extend a previous model for the EMT to include the effect of local structural distortions through an elastic energy term. We find that by strong electric pulsing, the induced metastable phase may become further stabilized by the electroelastic effect. We present a systematic study of the model by numerical simulations and compare the results to experiments in Mott insulators of the AM(4)Q(8) family. Our work significantly extends the scope of our recently introduced leaky-integrate-and-fire Mott neuron {[}P. Stoliar et al., Adv. Funct. Mat. 27, 1604740 (2017)] to provide a better insight into the physical mechanism of its relaxation. This is a key feature for future implementations of neuromorphic circuits.
J. del Valle, et al., “Resistive asymmetry due to spatial confinement in first-order phase transitions”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 98, p. 045123, 2018.Abstract
We report an asymmetry in the R vs T characteristics across the first-order metal-insulator transition (MIT) of V2O3 nanowires. The resistance changes in a few, large jumps during cooling through the MIT, while it does it in a smoother way during warming. The asymmetry is greatly enhanced as the width of the nanowire approaches a characteristic domain size. Our results, together with previous reports on VO2 {[}W. Fan et al., Phys. Rev. B 83, 235102 (2011)] and FeRh {[}V. Uhlir et al., Nat. Commun. 7, 13113 (2016)] imply that asymmetry is a generic feature of first-order phase transitions in one-dimensional systems. We show that this behavior is a simple, elegant consequence of the combined effects of the transition hysteresis and the temperature dependence of the insulating gap in this case (and generically, the order parameter relevant for the physical observable). We conclude that our proposed asymmetry mechanism is universally applicable to many electronic first-order phase transitions.
B. van der Meer, van Damme, R., Dijkstra, M., Smallenburg, F., and Filion, L., “Revealing a Vacancy Analog of the Crowdion Interstitial in Simple Cubic Crystals”, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, vol. 121, p. 258001, 2018.Abstract
Vacancies in simple cubic crystals of hard cubes are known to delocalize over one-dimensional chains of several lattice sites. Here, we use computer simulations to examine the structure and dynamics of vacancies in simple cubic crystals formed by hard cubes, right rhombic prisms (slanted cubes), truncated cubes, and particles interacting via a soft isotropic pair potential. We show that these vacancies form a vacancy analog of the crowdion interstitial, generating a strain field which follows a soliton solution of the sine-Gordon equation, and diffusing via a persistent random walk. Surprisingly, we find that the structure of these ``voidions{''} is not significantly affected by changes in density, vacancy concentration, and even particle interaction. We explain this structure quantitatively using a one-dimensional model that includes the free-energy barrier particles have to overcome to slide between lattice sites and the effective pair interaction along this line. We argue that voidions are a robust phenomenon in systems of repulsive particles forming simple cubic crystals.
M. N. de Biniossek, Loewen, H., Voigtmann, T., and Smallenburg, F., “Static structure of active Brownian hard disks”, JOURNAL OF PHYSICS-CONDENSED MATTER, vol. 30, p. 074001, 2018.Abstract
We explore the changes in static structure of a two-dimensional system of active Brownian particles (ABP) with hard-disk interactions, using event-driven Brownian dynamics simulations. In particular, the effect of the self-propulsion velocity and the rotational diffusivity on the orientationally-averaged fluid structure factor is discussed. Typically activity increases structural ordering and generates a structure factor peak at zero wave vector which is a precursor of motility-induced phase separation. Our results provide reference data to test future statistical theories for the fluid structure of active Brownian systems. This manuscript was submitted for the special issue of the Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter associated with the Liquid Matter Conference 2017.
V. Kaladzhyan, Bena, C., and Simon, P., “Topology from triviality”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 97, p. 104512, 2018.Abstract
We show that bringing into proximity two topologically trivial systems can give rise to a topological phase. More specifically, we study a 1D metallic nanowire proximitized by a 2D superconducting substrate with a mixed s-wave and p-wave pairing, and we demonstrate both analytically and numerically that the phase diagram of such a setup can be richer than reported before. Thus apart from the two ``expected{''} well-known phases (i.e., where the substrate and the wire are both simultaneously trivial or topological), we show that there exist two peculiar phases in which the nanowire can be in a topological regime while the substrate is trivial and vice versa.
Z. Iftikhar, et al., “Tunable quantum criticality and super-ballistic transport in a ``charge{''} Kondo circuit”, SCIENCE, vol. 360, p. 1315-1320, 2018.Abstract
Quantum phase transitions (QPTs) are ubiquitous in strongly correlated materials. However, the microscopic complexity of these systems impedes the quantitative understanding of QPTs. We observed and thoroughly analyzed the rich strongly correlated physics in two profoundly dissimilar regimes of quantum criticality. With a circuit implementing a quantum simulator for the three-channel Kondo model, we reveal the universal scalings toward different low-temperature fixed points and along the multiple crossovers from quantum criticality. An unanticipated violation of the maximum conductance for ballistic free electrons is uncovered. The present charge pseudospin implementation of a Kondo impurity opens access to a broad variety of strongly correlated phenomena.
B. Braunecker and Simon, P., “Tunneling spectroscopy between one-dimensional helical conductors”, PHYSICAL REVIEW B, vol. 98, p. 115146, 2018.Abstract
We theoretically investigate the tunneling spectroscopy of a system of two parallel one-dimensional helical conductors in the interacting, Luttinger liquid regime. We calculate the nonlinear differential conductance as a function of the voltage bias between the conductors and the orbital momentum shift induced on tunneling electrons by an orthogonal magnetic field. We show that the conductance map exhibits an interference pattern which is characteristic to the interacting helical liquid. This can be contrasted with the different interference pattern from tunneling between regular Luttinger liquids which is governed by the spin-charge separation of the elementary collective excitations.
G. Montambaux, Lim, L. - K., Fuchs, J. - N., and Piechon, F., “Winding Vector: How to Annihilate Two Dirac Points with the Same Charge”, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, vol. 121, p. 256402, 2018.Abstract
The merging or emergence of a pair of Dirac points may be classified according to whether the winding numbers which characterize them are opposite (+- scenario) or identical (++ cenario). From the touching point between two parabolic bands (one of them can be flat), two Dirac points with the same winding number emerge under appropriate distortion (interaction, etc.), following the ++ scenario. Under further distortion, these Dirac points merge following the +- scenario, that is corresponding to opposite winding numbers. This apparent contradiction is solved by the fact that the winding number is actually defined around a unit vector on the Bloch sphere and that this vector rotates during the motion of the Dirac points. This is shown here within the simplest two-band lattice model (Mielke) exhibiting a flat band. We argue on several examples that the evolution between the two scenarios is general.
2017
D. J. Groenendijk, et al., “Spin-Orbit Semimetal SrIrO3 in the Two-Dimensional Limit”, PHYSICAL REVIEW LETTERS, vol. 119, p. 256403, 2017.Abstract
We investigate the thickness-dependent electronic properties of ultrathin SrIrO3 and discover a transition from a semimetallic to a correlated insulating state below 4 unit cells. Low-temperature magnetoconductance measurements show that spin fluctuations in the semimetallic state are significantly enhanced while approaching the transition point. The electronic properties are further studied by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, showing that 4 unit cell SrIrO(3)d is on the verge of a gap opening. Our density functional theory calculations reproduce the critical thickness of the transition and show that the opening of a gap in ultrathin SrIrO3 requires antiferromagnetic order.

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